• Pét-Nat: A Wine First Made By French Monks Renewed

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    Sparkling wine has long been the cultural treat for success & celebration. One of the longest-standing methods in popping bottles is back in a big way. Pétillant naturel, or “pét-nat” for short, is the natural “methode ancestrale” of making sparkling wine. Originated by monks in the 16th century in Limoux, France, the fermenting juice is bottled before the initial fermentation ends. The fermentation then continues in bottle giving it natural fizz and often left affectionately unfiltered, paying homage to its heritage as a low intervention wine. Its edginess is part of the charm; it’s not meant to be a formal sipper but rather a fun, easy, and analog way to enjoy bubbles.
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    As a comparison, Champagne is very classical, but pét-nat is more independant. It’s raw, it’s natural and it’s very vintage-specific, which makes it exciting. Not a wine to hold on to, pét-nat needs to be enjoyed in its youth. Lower in alcohol, it makes a wonderful bridge for cider or beer drinkers. These characteristics makes it an excellent food wine pairing with everything from Thai curries to that greasy corner slice. Fatty, salty, and crushable foods deserve an equally comfortable companion.
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    Technical and risky, pét-nat requires constant supervision. Despite it’s laissez-faire style, it’s still very meticulous. Monitored several times a day as it’s wild fermentation (using only naturally- occurring yeasts), skin contact, and low intervention require delicate timing in regards to bottling amongst other characteristic sensitivities. The risk is part of the excitement!
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    Essentially a field blend of Riesling, Gewürz. and Geisenheim (and the ratio changes according to each vintage) and left them on their skins to ferment for about eight days. This imparts a very unique pearl-iridescence colour to the wine and gives some tart complexity and tannin to an otherwise very fruity wine.
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    Stone fruit such as peaches and hard nectarines are the forefront to secondary notes such as white pepper, grapefruit, and cucumber. It’s just so fresh. Unfiltered and unapologetic, this one should be enjoyed young, cold, and for any occasion you like.
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